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Fix the Court Applauds House Democrats for Including Supreme Court Ethics in Sweeping H.R. 1

A Fix the Court-backed measure that would direct Supreme Court justices to create a professional code of conduct akin to existing rules for their lower court counterparts will be included in H.R. 1, the House Democrats’ ethics-focused first bill of the new Congress.

Supreme Court justices, like judges of U.S. District Courts and U.S. Courts of Appeals, are required to follow the federal recusal statute, 28 U.S.C. 455, which is based on the common law maxim that no one should be a judge in his own case and proscribes participation in cases featuring family members and personal investments.

Beyond that, lower court judges are required to follow the Code of Conduct for U.S. Judges, which sanctions against political activity and proactively states that judges “should uphold the integrity and independence of the judiciary” and “should avoid impropriety and the appearance of impropriety in all activities.”

Even as detractors have noted that a conduct code would not be fully enforceable at Supreme Court, given there’s no recourse or reprimand for non-compliance save the high bar of impeachment, the thinking that our nation’s top judges should follow tougher ethics rules remains meritorious, with 86% of Americans in favor of implementing a SCOTUS ethics code.

“It’s malpractice for Supreme Court justices to be exempt from the federal judiciary’s code of conduct, and they know it,” FTC executive director Gabe Roth said. “This omission is something both Republicans and Democrats alike have recognized in this past Congress as injudicious, and I’m pleased that lawmakers are already talking about introducing a measure in the new session to improve high court ethics rules.”

Here is a list of the House and Senate bills introduced in the 115th Congress that include Supreme Court ethics provisions:

House:
– Judiciary ROOM Act (H.R. 6755): would require the Judicial Conference to issue a new code for all Article III judges, with a carve out for justices since they’re not fungible; has four co-sponsors (all Republican); passed committee unanimously and awaits floor action
– Supreme Court Ethics Act (H.R. 1960): would require the justices to write their own code of conduct that includes the Code of Conduct for U.S. Judges; has 96 co-sponsors (all Democrats); no hearing / no vote
– Anti-Corruption and Public Integrity Act (H.R. 7140); would require that the Code of Conduct for U.S. Judges, which lower court judges follow, be applicable to Supreme Court justices; has 10 co-sponsors (all Democrats); was introduced earlier this month

Senate:
– Supreme Court Ethics Act (S. 835): would require the justices to write their own code of conduct that includes the Code of Conduct for U.S. Judges; has 16 co-sponsors (all Democrats); no hearing / no vote
– Anti-Corruption and Public Integrity Act (S. 3357); would require that the Code of Conduct for U.S. Judges, which lower court judges follow, be applicable to Supreme Court justices; has 1 sponsor, Sen. Warren; no hearing / no vote

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